Male Involvement in Child Care Activities: A Review of the Literature in Botswana

Wananani B Jorosi-Tshiamo, Keitshokile D Mogobe, Mosidi T Mokotedi

Abstract

Engaging men as partners in childrearing is critical because of the positive aspects on the child’s development and reduction of childhood illnesses. The paper presents findings from a literature review whose aim was to assess the extent to which males are involved in child care activities. Findings revealed a limited number of studies conducted in the area of male involvement. Socio-cultural factors have a negative influence on men’s participation on child care activities. In addition, some laws were prohibitive to male involvement. It was difficult to assess the extent to which males were involved due to inadequate data collection tools. Recommendations include a study on male involvement, review of the existing Sexual and Reproductive Health data collection tools, development of a policy on paternity leave, strengthening training on male involvement; community sensitization on cultural stereotypes and harmonization of customary and common laws. (Afr J Reprod Health 2013; 17[4]: 35-42).

Full Text:

PDF

References

United Nations. United Nations Population and Development: Programme of Action Adopted at the International Conference on Population and Development Conference-Cairo. New York. 1994.

United States Agency for International Development (USAID). Men key to reducing maternal deaths in developing countries. 2010 Frontlines. May 2012. Available at: http://www.mchip.net/node/119.

Alva S. Gender Attitude and Male Involvement in Maternal Health Care in Rwanda. San Francisco. Population Association of America, 2012.

Losike-Sedimo N, Mbongwe N and Kote M. Child rearing practices in Botswana: A challenge for developmentally appropriate education and career choices. In: Maundeni T, (Ed). Thari ya bana; reflections on children in Botswana 2010. Gaborone: UNICEF, 2010, 22-26.

Government of Botswana. National Population Policy. Gaborone: Ministry of Finance and Development Planning, 1997.

Government of Botswana and United Nations. Botswana Millennium Development Goals: Status Report 2004: Achievements, future challenges and choices. Gaborone: Tiger Design and Graphics, 2004.

Government of Botswana and United Nations. Botswana Millennium Development Goals: Status Report 2010. Gaborone: Printing and Publishing Company Botswana, 2010.

Government of Botswana and UNFPA. Policy Guidance to Male Involvement in Sexual and Reproductive Health, HIV/AIDS and Gender based violence, prevention and management: An Addendum to Sexual and Reproductive Health (SRH) Policy Guidelines and Service Standards. Gaborone: Sexual and Reproductive Health Division, 2008.

African Union. Maputo Plan of Action for the operationalization of the continental policy frame work for Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights; 2007-2010. Maputo: African Union Commission, 2006.

United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) Country Support Team for the South Pacific 1999. Available at: www.un.org/ecosocdef/geninfo/population

Lamb M Pleck, J; Charnove et.al. A biosocial perspective on paternal behavior and involvement. In Lancaster J, Altman, J, Rossi, A et al (Ed) Parenting across the life: Biosocial perspectives. NewYork; Academic Press 1987.

Sarkadi AR, Karistiansson R, Oberklaid R and Bermberg, S. Father’s involvement and children’s developmental outcomes: A systematic review of longitudinal studies Acta Pediatrica 2008; 97 (2): 153-158.

Flouri E and Buchanan A. Early Father’s and Mother’s involvement and child’s later educational outcomes. British Journal of Educational Psychology 2004; 74 (2): 141-153.

Ministry of Women’s Affairs Department of Labour 2009; Available at: http://www.dol.govt.nz/publications/research/men-participation-in-unpaid-care/participation-in-unpaid-care.pdf

Potter C, Walker G and Keen B. “ I am reading to her and she loves it: benefits of engaging fathers from disadvantaged areas in their children’s early learning transitions International Research Journal 201333174-89. Available at http://dx.doi.org//10.1080/09575146.2012.666959

Ditekemena J, Koole O, Engmann C, Matendo R, Tshefu A, Ryder R, and Colenbunders R. Determinants of male involvement in maternal and child health services in Sub Saharan Africa: A review Reproductive Health 2010; 9 32 2-8 Available at: http://www.reproductive-health-journal.com/content/9/1/32

Sabone MB. Transformation in gender roles and relationships: Impact on child care and socialization. In Maundeni T; Osei Huwedie B; Mukamaambo EP and Ntseane P.(Eds). Male involvement in Sexual and Reproductive Health: Prevention of Violence and HIV/AIDS in Botswana. Cape Town: Made Plain Communications 2009; 165 -76

Government of Botswana and UNFPA. Factors shaping male involvement in Sexual and Reproductive Health, prevention of HIV/AIDS and gender based violence in selected districts in Botswana. Gaborone; Ministry of Health, 2007.

Preece J. Gender, power relations and HIV Crisis in Botswana: Some food for thought. Pula: Botswana Journal of African Studies 2001; 15 (2): 224-29.

Kang’ethe SM. Inadequate male involvement in health issues: the cause of gender skewed HIV/AIDS in Botswana. In Maundeni T, Osei-Huwedie B, Mukamaambo E,et. al.(Eds). Male involvement in Sexual and Reproductive Health: Prevention of Violence and HIV/AIDS in Botswana. Cape Town: Made Plain Communications. 2009; 7-28.

Government of Botswana and UNFPA. A National Strategy and Programme for Action for Male Involvement in Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights, the Prevention of HIV/AIDS and Gender Based Violence 2007-2012. Gaborone: Undated.

Letshwenyo-Maruatona S. Male participation in Sexual and Reproductive Health. Gaborone: Unpublished PhD Dissertation, 2012.

Thobega K. Cultural curse of the absent father must come to an end Sunday Standard Online edition 2010 July 22.

Massoudi P, Wickberg B, Hwang CP. Fathers’ involvement in Swedish Child health care- the role of nurses’ practices and attitudes. Acta Paediatrica. 2011; 100:396-401.

Pestvenidze E, and Borer, M. Finally, daddies in the delivery room: Parents’ education in Georgia. Global Public Health 2007; 2(2): 169-183.

Nkuoh GN, Meyer DJ, Tih PM and Nkfusai J. Barriers to men’s participation in ante- natal and Prevention of Mother–to- Child HIV Transmission care in Cameroon, Africa. Journal of Midwifery and Woman Health 2010; 55:363-6

Palitza K. One man can–Men who are challenging stereotypes. Available at: http://www.motherforall.org/component/content/artcile/49-events/158-motherssalutethe..accessed 10December2011.

Mukamaambo EP, Mutabihirwa VRN. The importance of data collection and analysis of male involvement in reproductive health issues. In Maundeni T, Osei-Huwedie B, Mukamaambo E, et. al. (Eds). Male involvement in Sexual and Reproductive Health:Prevention of Violence and HIV/AIDS in Botswana. Cape Town: Made Plain Communication, 2009,149-64.

Government of Botswana and UNFPA. Reference manual for district Male Action Groups: A social mobilization strategy for Male involvement in Sexual and Reproductive Health. Prevention and Management of Gender Based Violence and Sexually Transmitted Diseases, HIV/AIDS. Gaborone: Ministry of Health, undated.

Mogobe KD, Leburu VM, Motshwane VN. Male involvement in antenatal care project report. Gaborone: Unpublished document, 2006.

Refbacks

  • There are currently no refbacks.